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The Monkey's Paw

The Monkey's Paw
by W.W. Jacobs
Book and Cassette
The Raven and the Monkey's Paw: Classics of Horror and Suspense

Part II - Page Four

 Continued from PREVIOUS PAGE

IN THE BRIGHTNESS of the wintry sun next morning as it streamed over the breakfast table, Herbert laughed at his fears. There was an air of prosaic wholesomeness about the room which it had lacked on the previous night, and the dirty, shriveled little paw was pitched on the sideboard with a carelessness which betokened no great belief in its virtues.

"I suppose all old soldiers are the same," said Mrs. White. "The idea of our listening to such nonsense! How could wishes be granted in these days? And if they could, how could two hundred pounds hurt you, Father?"

"Might drop on his head from the sky," said the frivolous Herbert.

"Morris said the things happened so naturally," said his father, "that you might, if you so wished, attribute it to coincidence."

"Well, don't break into the money before I come back," said Herbert, as he rose from the table. "I'm afraid it'll turn you into a mean, avaricious man, and we shall have to disown you."

His mother laughed, and following him to the door, watched him down the road, and returning to the breakfast table, was very happy at the expense of her husband's credulity. All of which did not prevent her from scurrying to the door at the postman's knock, nor prevent her from referring somewhat shortly to retired sergeant majors of bibulous habits, when she found that the post brought a tailor's bill.

"Herbert will have some more of his funny remarks, I expect, when he comes home," she said, as they sat at dinner.

"I daresay," said Mr. White, pouring himself some beer; "but for all that, the thing moved in my hand; that I'll swear to."

"You thought it did," said the old lady soothingly.

"I say it did," replied the other. "There was no thought about it; I had just-- What's the matter?"

His wife made no reply. She was watching the mysterious movements of a man outside, who, peering in an undecided fashion at the house, appeared to be trying to make up his mind to enter. In mental connection with the two hundred pounds, she noticed that the stranger was well dressed and wore a silk hat of glossy newness. Three times he paused at the gate, and then walked on again. The fourth time he stood with his hand upon it, and then with sudden resolution, flung it open and walked up the path. Mrs. White at the same moment placed her hands behind her, and hurriedly unfastening the strings of her apron, put that useful article of apparel beneath the cushion of her chair.

22. How is the day today?
It's cold and raining and everything feels strange today.
It's bright, sunny and everything feels normal today.
It's a mysterious, dark and strange day.

23. Where did Herbert go?
He went to work.
He's working in the garden.
He went to his room.

24. Where is the monkey paw today?
It's on the piano.
It's on the sideboard.
It's in the fireplace.

25. When the postman brought a tailor's bill and no money, how did Mrs. White feel?
She was a little angry at Sergeant-Major Morris.
She was very happy.
She was very worried.

26. Describe the stranger:
The stranger's clothes are shiny, and he is old. He's very angry.
The stranger's clothes are silk, and his hat is tall. He's very courageous.
The stranger's clothes are nice, and his hat is new. He's very nervous.

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